Fuel Your Curiosity

Every season. Something new to explore.

Reeves-Reed Arboretum offers 13.5 acres of natural beauty, including historic and contemporary gardens and six acres of woodland forest. Whether you are interested in gardening, hiking, art, bird watching, community involvement, or a place for quiet contemplation, the arboretum has something for you. Photo courtesy of Stephen Harris, sph-photo.com.

What's in Bloom

Spring is in full swing at the arboretum. You won't want to miss how these plants are responding to longer, warmer days.

Horticulture

Reeves-Reed Arboretum is dedicated to preserving the past and imagining the future of American gardening. Our landscapes include natural woodlands, open vistas that owe much to 19th century visionaries like Andrew Downing and Frederick Law Olmsted (Olmsted's partner Calvert Vaux actually produced the first design for the property), and more formal gardens that exemplify the Country Place movement of the early 20th century.

The Historic Gardens

Three Reeves-Reed gardens are maintained as closely as possible to their original appearance, while the Time Capsule Garden moves through time and space.

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The Contemporary Gardens

From the bold plant combinations along the Welcome Walk to the more traditional Perennial Border, Reeves-Reed’s many garden environments offer old and new.

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Horticultural Highlights

There’s always something in season at Reeves-Reed Arboretum. Here are 9 plants you won't want to miss during your visit.

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Freeman Medal Collection

Several of our plants have won the Montine McDaniel Freeman Horticulture Medal, the Garden Club of America's Plant of the Year award for native plants.

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The Woodland Trails

The Arboretum features almost 6 acres of woodland and nearly a mile of trails. Witness the tallest tulip poplar in Summit, as well as native shrubs and herbaceous plants.

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Yearly Plant Sale

Every year the Horticulture department sells a variety of plants propagated from seed originating from the Arboretum.

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History

Reeves-Reed Arboretum is listed on the National and State Registers of Historic Places. Its estate and gardens represent design trends by prominent landscape architects of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Lenni Lenape Native Americans passed through the property on their route from the coastal areas near Elizabeth, NJ to Schooley's Mountain, further inland. During the Revolutionary period, the area was adjacent to the Old Sow Revolutionary War Cannon and the Signal Beacon atop Beacon Hill. Learn more about these early eras, as well as the Wisners, the founding family of "The Clearing" (as the Arboretum was originally called) and the Reeves and Reed families.

Prehistory

Long before European settlers came to this region, it was inhabited by the Lenni Lenape Indians, a mobile, hunter-gatherer society.

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Historical Highlights

The grounds of the Arboretum were once a bastion of resistance during the American Revolution.

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The Reeves, the Reeds & "The Clearing"

From 1889 through the founding of the Arboretum in 1974, three families put their impress on the buildings and grounds that now comprise Reeves-Reed Arboretum.

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Landscape Architecture

Three distinguished landscape architects of the late 19th and early 20th century – Calvert Vaux, Ellen Biddle Shipman, and Carl F. Pilat – left their mark at The Clearing.

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Exhibits

Reeves-Reed Arboretum announces its first art exhibition of the 2016 season – NEW GROWTH: bent-wood sculptures by Susan Manspeizer.

Westchester artist, Susan Manspeizer, with a career spanning three decades, has produced an exhibition, NEW GROWTH, celebrating nature's life-affirming vitality and maturity, characterized by vibrant, deftly-formed bent-wood sculptures of color, beauty, form and grace. A gardener as well, Manspeizer "likes the process of living, of plants going from the bud of a flower to maturity and eventually decay. We are constantly growing and reinventing ourselves....leaving behind something in order to move forward in life." This philosophy of rebirth or new growth is so in tune with life experienced in a garden and especially at the Arboretum.

In the early '80s, after years of painting figurative imagery, Manspeizer freed her line from the canvas. Her sculptures are made of wood, and this once-living material is repurposed - transformed and given new life. She bends and coaxes the wood into seemingly impossibly folded and looping rhythmic constructions of saturated hues and undulating contours, and the finished pieces, whether free-standing or wall-hung, seem to soar in space.

NEW GROWTH: bent-wood sculptures by Susan Manspeizer, opened at the Wisner House Gallery on Sunday, February 21 with a public reception, and will run through May 8. All the works are for sale, and the artist will donate 30% of all purchases to Reeves-Reed Arboretum.

Additionally, Reeves-Reed Arboretum features artist Tony Crowe and the works from his current installation, "A Quiet Man... At the Crossroads" on display at the Hat Tavern in the Grand Summit Hotel, 570 Springfield Avenue Summit NJ 07901.

Reeves-Reed Arboretum - An Invitation to Explore...nature defined
908-273-8787
165 Hobart Ave, Summit, NJ 07901
Grounds Open Dawn to Dusk | Office Hours Tues - Fri 10am - 4pm